Support Ron Wilson

Support Ron Wilson


"Ron studied photography at The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale. During his education at AIFL he was selected for an internship at The Miami Herald. The internship was an invaluable experience, which helped mold him and his talents into the person he is today. He continued to freelance for The Miami Herald after the end of his internship, where he photographed everything from celebrities, breaking news, and portraits to daily features. He was granted a scholarship from Polaroid and upon graduation, he was awarded The Best Portfolio in his graduating class.

After graduating he headed off to Budapest, Hungary for another internship with Atlantic News Service. His assignments there ranged from local Hungarian news, to traveling with and covering Hilary Rodham-Clinton’s visit to Eastern Europe to photographing the end of the Bosnian war in Sarajevo. After he returned to United States, he relocated to New York City where he has worked in many different fields of photography such as fashion, commercial, architecture, and portraiture. He has covered every possible subject from the World Trade Center Tragedy to the blackout of 2003, and has been published in many publications such as The New York Times, Modern Bride, Asian Photography and Imaging Magazine, and RangeFinder Magazine. After shooting projects for Photographers Without Borders in Ukraine, India, Botswana, and Guatemala recently, Ron realized that photography has the power to literally change the world, and that's what he intends to do from now on with his life and career. Below are some of his favorites photos from those projects."


Ron is currently working on his blog Art, Style, Flow 

http://www.artstyleflow.com, an inspirational Travel, Style and Fine-Art Photography project, and just published the premier issue of an accompanying magazine. He is also writing a book which is half photography instruction and half personal stories.


1. What makes you passionate about helping Society Against Sexual Orientation Discrimination (SASOD) www.sasod.org.gy

I currently live in Miami, FL and lived in New York City before that. Both cities are very liberal and have large LBGT communities. I am looking forward to visiting Georgetown, and helping document the work of SASOD. As the world changes it's view on sexual orientation, it's important to remember, point out, and help with the ground-breaking hard work being done in countries like Guyana by SASOD. I feel privileged to have this opportunity.

2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

I bring 25 years of passion and experience as a professional photographer, and look forward to listening to and learning from SASOD. I will have two full weeks getting to know the organization, which will give me time to accurately tell their story.

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

This will be my fifth project for PWB. I love that each project is so different, but that they all have the same goal: to help others and make a difference in the world. I sincerely appreciate all of the support I have received for these assignments, and look forward to getting to Guyana and getting to work!

Support Charlotte Hodges

Support Charlotte Hodges

Artist statement

I have always had a deep yearning to understand and document the unknown, or that which may not have a voice in our turbulent world. Through my attempts to do so I have picked up various forms of artistic expressions that I believe have helped to appropriately fit the content and contexts of that which I am documenting and attempting to express. I am a photographer, painter and writer, but so much more. I have stopped trying to define my purpose in life because I believe that words can at times be limiting in their definitions. I purposely decide to leave out much of my life as “undefined” so as to allow it the room to continually grow and transform as my path unfolds. 

What makes you passionate about helping Humanity Crew?

During my recent travels through Italy I was stunned by the number of locals I met who harboured great animosity towards the refugee situation in their homeland. In my twenty-four years of extensive travels I had never before been faced with such unapologetic xenophobia. I had always thought it a natural human reflex to help another when in a state of distress. Yet, there I was in a picturesque country, surrounded by cinematic beauty, hearing stories of families and children arriving to detention camps facing unimaginable circumstances. All this relayed to me through the clenched teeth of business owners whose fear of economic collapse stripped their narratives of any emotion whatsoever. The experience was bone chilling to my apparently naïve view of the world.

Although I have yet to visit a refugee camp in person, my experience in Italy left my confidence in the world’s state of compassion shaken. I have always been one to put myself in other’s shoes, instinctively taking on the world’s pain as though it where my own. Faced with the reality that not everyone necessarily wants the world to be a good, safe, and happy place for everyone -- if it means compromising their own good-fortunes -- made me realize the extent  dehumanization refugees are being faced with. I couldn’t shake the feeling that should I find myself in similar circumstances I too would be treated with contempt. I am passionate about helping Humanity Crew and joining their efforts in Greece because I believe the situation refugees are facing shouldn’t be anyone’s reality. From an outside perspective, Humanity Crew seems to have a unique approach to getting involved and lending a helping hand to the cause. I can only imagine the circumstances in Greece and elsewhere for refugees calls for extensive psychological support. While most seem to focus on addressing physical needs at detention camps, Humanity Crew is highlighting emotional support, and I wholeheartedly support their approach.


How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?
 Photography can be a magical tool, but as with most other things in life, it has its downfalls. Recently I have noticed a trend with photographers documenting humanitarian issues. Their photography seems to be focused on the gritty, dirty, hard to swallow aspects of a situation. While this photojournalistic tactic may do the trick for grasping the public’s attention and getting people to understand difficulties they may otherwise be unable to relate to –I can’t imagine the outcome is as appealing to the subjects being documented. I believe my photography can make a difference because my focus is on creating collaborative works in partnership with my subjects.  I aim to get everyone on board and happy with the way they are being portrayed to the public.  I want to make sure the refugees I work with are portrayed to the public as they wish to be seen, with dignity --or more simply as they view themselves. In my experience, this switch to subject based photography can help re-construct mainstream narratives. Instead of presenting a condensed big picture which can often be misconstrued from an outside perspective, I aim to capture and share the variety of personal narratives that make up the bigger picture.


What message would you like to send to your supporters?

Support me in supporting Humanity Crew, or get involved yourself!

Stay connected to my work in Greece and follow my travels via Instagram: @chacha.m.hodges or through my website chachamhodges.com

Support Tad Philipp

Support Tad Philipp

Q1. What makes you passionate about helping WomenWeave?

I love that WomenWeave empowers women in central India and also helps them to maintain a craft that is important to India’s cultural heritage. From my perspective as the son, husband and father of strong and independent-minded women, I appreciate how important empowered women are to their families and to their communities.

This will be my second trip to India, and I truly enjoyed my prior experience with Indian people and culture. I am honored to be invited to WomenWeave as part of the PWB program to create images that will help share their inspiring story.


Q2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

Photographic images have the power to help others understand a story in a deep and nuanced way, in many cases inspiring a call to action. By creating images that are authentic, respectful and and impactful I hope to enhance WomenWeave’s global donor outreach as well as help them sell their exquisite products.

For more about WomenWeave go to: WomenWeave.org For Tad’s photography portfolio go to: earthwindphoto.com


Q3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I am fortunate to have had a successful business career and will fully funding the program fee and expenses. Therefore, 100% of your donation will be shared equally between PWB and WomenWeave. You already know that NGO’s such as WomenWeave make a big difference in the communities they serve, and that a small donation goes a long way in developing economies. Please donate now to this wonderful and worthy organization.

Support Ken Kurzweil

Support Ken Kurzweil

BIO

I was born, raised and still live in the suburbs of New York City.  During a very rewarding 35-year career as a teacher of computer science and life sciences, I was also heavily involved in the New York State Teachers Union and a number of Social Justice/Civil & Human Rights issues.   In the Teachers Union, which represents over 600,00 members and over 1,200 local unions, I was chair of their Civil & Human Rights Committee for over 15 years.  I received the greatest honor of my life when in 2016 they created the annual “Ken Kurzweil Social Justice Recognition Award” which is awarded each year to local unions that support social justice causes throughout the year. 

After retiring from teaching, photography quickly rose to become a very important passion of mine.  Photography has brought me to places I never imagined I would travel and allowed me to get to know different cultures around the world.   I had been looking for ways to incorporate my commitment to social justice with my photography when I discovered Photographers Without Borders.  After participating in the PWB School program in Jodhpur, I felt that it was important for me to continue my work with PWB in one of their programs.

 

What makes you passionate about helping Turning Point (www.turningpoint.org.in)

Mental illness is a topic that is not understood by many people around the world.  When it strikes, it is often not accepted by the family and the victim is stigmatized and often does not receive any treatment.  The mentally ill become isolated and lose any confidence that they can be a part of normal society.

The Turning Point has a goal of rehabilitating mentally challenged people and through their many programs restoring them to mainstream life where they can become confident, self-dependent and productive individuals.

The work of Turning Pont is extremely important and information about their programs need to be seen by a larger audience. 


How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

The stories about the programs and successes of Turning Point can be told in a very powerful way through photography.  A photograph can often explain in a very impactful way what words often cannot.   The power of the photograph can accomplish a great deal for Turning Point giving them resources that can be used for their publicity, fundraising and social media. 

It is my goal to give this important non-profit organization tools that they can use to better achieve their goals.


What message would you like to send your supporters?

While the problems of the world may often seem too overwhelming to deal with, I have learned that ground level organizations which help people one-at-a-time are life-changing and often life-saving.  The Turning Point is one such organization that helps people on a path of recovery and functionality from mental disabilities, often not understood or accepted in India.  I am very fortunate to be able to help this non-profit organization through my photography.

Support Samantha Moss

Support Samantha Moss

1. What makes you passionate about helping Alejo Community Support Project?

I admire NGOs like Alejo Community Support Project and the individuals who work for these grassroots initiatives. There are currently over 7 billion people in the world and it is easy to shrug responsibility and think 'Well, it doesn't really matter what I do or don't do...' But we are all at the center of a network.

You'll probably know at least 1,000 people over the course of your life. Those individuals will also probably know at least 1,000 people, which puts you 1 person away from a million. 2 people away from a billion. This is how we are connected.

The actions we take are like dropping a pebble in a pond. The ripples created by that action will expand and affect things in ways we can't really comprehend. It means the things that you do or don't do are far more important than you think. 

I am passionate about helping Alejo CSP because it is a meaningful cause, furthering sustainable development and generating real change in people's lives. 


2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

Photography has an amazing capacity to capture (no pun intended) our attention and tell a story to the viewer in a way words cannot. 

Grassroots initiatives like Alejo make direct, meaningful impacts in communities and better the standard of living for countless individuals. It is my job, as a photographer, to shine a light on their work and to help tell their stories. There is no way of knowing who will see these photos and what in turn they might be inspired to do to further positive change. 

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

If you would like to support the work we do, please make a donation or get involved in any you are motivated to. 

For any donation above $100 I would like to send you a personal thank-you in the form of a print of your choice from my portfolio. 

Please make sure to leave your email so that I may contact you for a mailing address.

Support Matt Timmins

Support Matt Timmins

BIO

I am a freelance photographer with a background in photojournalism based out of Revelstoke, BC, Canada.

Most of my time at home is spent exploring mountains, forests and lakes by foot, snowboard or bike. When I’m not at home I am exploring new countries, putting myself out of my comfort zone to photograph the natural beauty of the world and immersing myself in new cultures.

1. What makes you passionate about helping Planet Drum Foundation (www.planetdrum.org)?

Becoming ecologically sustainable should be a goal for every city. The dedication and work that Planet Drum is doing in Bahía de Caráquez, Ecuador, to help the community build and maintain sustainable ways to meet human needs such as water, food, energy and resources is inspiring and something I want to be a part of first-hand. They are working to teach the community the benefits of bringing forests back to recovery, building nature reserves and providing education on how living sustainably can help them in the long-term. I want to immerse myself in this project to both be able to help this eco-city and Planet Drum, and also to be able to come home with valuable experience of what it means to live in a sustainable city and use bioregional principals.

2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

Part of Planet Drum’s efforts involve workshops, school presentations and community education. Besides bringing the community out to workshops for hands-on demonstrations, a large part of helping people get an idea of what Planet Drum is doing is through visuals. Through photos and video, I can help show the importance of the work this NGO is doing.

As well, the NGO would not be able to function without volunteers and interns. Using visuals to help paint a picture of Planet Drum is doing will help recruit volunteers, supporters and raise global awareness.

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I invite you to follow along as I document Planet Drum’s work and the community of Bahía de Caráquez this June in Ecuador. You’ll be able to see updates on my own social media, as well as through Photographers Without Borders. Everyone can benefit from taking more steps to urban sustainably, and I’m excited to share and learn new initiatives with you. The project would not be possible without volunteers and donations from the past 15 years, and new projects and work is not possible without continued support. If you are able, I ask for your support as I head to Ecuador this June. No donation is too small.

Thank you.

Support Leya Russell

Support Leya Russell

BIO

Hi, I’m Leya!

Inspired to feel a deeper connection with the world, I am driven to actively create. Establishing a professional photography business in Calgary, Alberta, while continuing to build on my Fine Art practice, makes me grateful for the opportunity to bring together communities through visual storytelling.

An explorer at heart, I have travelled extensively throughout my life, always eager for what is yet to come. Southeast Asia, being dearest to my heart, has made me realize that no matter your background, we are all family with knowledge to share and compassion to give. I find a great sense of humility in travelling and am continually filled with a sense of wonder and awe at the ever-changing surroundings. Using the lens as my tool to piece together diverse elements, I find photography to be a potent medium for building a bridge between cultures.

What makes you passionate about supporting CDD?
I am specifically interested in Bangladesh as it is situated in a unique geographic and economic position. Affected by rising sea levels as a result of climate change, Bangladesh is facing environmental disaster, encompassing large areas of inhabited land being affected.

These environmental and economic conditions severely impact the disabled communities, who are most at risk. CDD raises awareness of the problems facing Bangladesh and provides viable solutions. They focus on providing strategic emergency evacuation planning, help the disabled to find employment and provide access to goods and services. Photography can be a valuable tool in sharing these stories. It can motivate people to act and provide much-needed assistance. I strongly support the work of CDD and believe their efforts result in tangible and positive change.


How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

After returning from my first journey to India, my photography became a powerful tool of communication. The images provided a profound perspective, that words alone could not achieve. Through these images, people gained a better understanding of foreign cultures. I believe that photography connects on a beautiful, emotional level, that it can ignite a call to action. My professional photography skills will aid the CDD to tell a more complete story of the situation and achieve their goals of further benefiting society.


What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I am deeply committed to helping the CDD and the people of Bangladesh. Any support or donation that you make will be greatly appreciated and go a long way. Only together, can we make a significant change in the lives of the disabled in Bangladesh.

Support Andrea Sarcos

Support Andrea Sarcos

ANDREA SARCOS

PWB had the chance to sit down to discuss Andrea’s upcoming trip to Nepal.

Andrea Sarcos was born in Caracas, Venezuela and raised in Florida. She graduated from the University of Florida in 2015 with a dual bachelors degree in Journalism and Creative Photography. She works as a full-time multimedia storyteller and has spent the past few years traveling around the globe learning about different peoples and cultures. She is passionate about continuing on this journey and expanding her efforts to help those in need.

About the Photographer

I was born in Caracas, Venezuela. At the young age of four, my mother packed up a suitcase full of my favorite Barbie dolls and clothes and we flew to the United States. Florida became our home.

When my parents decided to move to another country to give me a better future, I was too young to know how big of a decision they had made. But looking back now, I am forever grateful to them because of all the amazing opportunities I’ve had while living in the U.S. I’ve had the resources to help me realize my full potential, and now I’m ready to give back to others.

I am passionate about helping Firefly Children’s Home and Prisoner’s Assistance’s children’s homes because they exist to educate and nurture Nepali children to reach their full potential. These kids are able to have a chance to live a good life despite their circumstances.

I strongly believe we’re all connected. Through our shared planet, waters, air, hope and dreams. All children, regardless of race, ethnicity, social or economic background deserve to be raised in a nurturing environment.

I am positive that helping Firefly Children’s Home will have a positive ripple affect on their community, Nepal, and even the world. As a full-time photographer with a dual bachelors degree in journalism and creative photography, I will do my best to portray these organizations in an honest light. I love spending as much time as I can getting to know my subjects and their environment. I aim for those who view my photos to feel like they were actually there, to feel the energy and emotions of people who live on the other side of the globe. By amplifying the voices of those who are most vulnerable, we can gain humbling new perspectives and be the force for awareness, aid and change.

Support Lee Bartran (Cambodia)

Support Lee Bartran (Cambodia)

BIO

I’m Lee….a Colorado native, single mom to seven (four who were adopted), deep-thinking introvert who is passionate about travel, photography, giving back and storytelling for change.  

I am so excited to  have the opportunity to work alongside Damnok Toek in Cambodia and help them to share about the incredible work they are doing with vulnerable children.   Working with children has been an integral and important part of my personal and work life.  For 10 years,  my work was focused on orphaned children in China,  creating foster care programs, leading medical trips, and creating my own non-profit which operated in China.  My work  allowed medically frail orphaned children to get the medical care they needed, education and a loving environment where they could thrive.   

I have seen first hand the difference that can be made in a child’s life if they are given hope and opportunity.  Damnok Toek’s focus on street children, children with disabilities and trafficking victims is giving these children just that.  Spending a few weeks by their side,  hearing their heart and seeing their work first hand will provide the perfect backdrop to share their story.    When you combine powerful imagery with storytelling, and share your message with the world, it’s  impactful. …something I have experienced first hand.  So to play a small role in sharing their work, feels incredible and an opportunity I am so grateful for.  

Support Andrea Musso and Anna Chrul

Support Andrea Musso and Anna Chrul

ANDREA MUSSO

BIO

Andrea Musso is a photography and traveling passionate.

Born in Torino, Italy, he is living in Geneva (CH) area since more than 20 years.

Diversity of race, colour, faith, gender, and orientation are the key to enrich culture and tolerance; for this reason the photographer works mainly for non-profit organisations.

About the technique, subjects and composition, Andrea has received several international recognitions.

1.      What makes you passionate about helping MONES?

As a photographer I like to offer my free time to serve non-profit organisations that take care of people in general; serving someone that spend their energy and time to fight discrimination and violence is a honour. I am concerned by violence against women and recently, for November 25th 2018, International day agains domestic violence, I realised a photo project to sensitise people about it. An example is visible HERE.

In the specific case of MONES Organisation, being a man serving a cause against discrimination and violence on women has a tremendous meaning to me.

I already had collaborations in the past with several organisations: orpahanges, schools, hospitals, outreach health centers… every time is a small adventure and an amazing mix of feelings; to meet the people is a great experience and to discover other cultures is enriching.


2.      How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

Nowadays we need to communicate, and this is especially true for organisations that need sponsorships to fund their projects. A professional photographer can catch the moments in such a way that the observer understands better and faster the idea behind the project.Sometime I see people to cry watching some of my pics; this is the impact that a photo in this contest can give.On a website, a flyer or any communication tool, a professional photo can have a much bigger impact. For these reasons I think that my work can have a value and can help the organisation on the medium and long term.


3.      What message would you like to send to your supporters?

In western countries we do not realise how a small offer can have an impact on lives on the other side of the world; I can only encourage you to support this project in order to make it real, and in order to make many other projects possible.



As I have no other way to thank you than offering my work, so:

For any donation above 50$ the photographer will send you the HD file of a photo of your choice in my whole catalog.

For any donation above 200$ the photographer will send you a print of a photo of your choice with certificate of authenticity of limited number of prints (1/30); please send me your address by email in this case.

ANNA

BIO:

I’ve started my adventure with photography more than 10 years ago, at the beginning I treated it as way to spend free time and save some memories. I love to takes photos of nature and moments of everyday life. For long time I was too shy and didn't share my photos with others, but with time I improved my skills and also understood that photography is a powerful tool and can be used to help others – that is why I decided to join Photographers Without Borders.

What makes you passionate about helping MONES?

When I’ve read first time about MONES I was impressed by the variety of projects organized and followed by them – giving support to victims of home violence, improving the life quality and status of women, supporting women to be more active and visible by reducing the gender-based discrimination. I am excited to meet them and listen their motivations to better understand how my work can be as fruitful as possible.


How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

Iwill be my first experience as photographer for PWB, I would like to show with my photos the amount of work done by women from MONES. I’d like to show their professionalism and at the same time emotions which are “behind the scenes”, which accompanies their everyday work but often are not visible on official photos.

What message would you like to send to your supporters?

As a photographer I love to catch moments - it can be a second that passed not noticed by others but was meaningful for the person on the photography. I wish to share with you those special moments and show you that all over the world we are the same – we live similar emotions, we live sad and happy moments. I wish to show that there are people who cares about others and work hard to change our world to a better place. Thank you for all kind of support related to this project.

Support Lou Gilbert

Support Lou Gilbert

BIO

Framing the details of life through the lens has become Lou’s passion. She is an educator, book artist and travelling photographer, based in Brisbane.

With a preference for purposeful travel, Lou has volunteered as a photographer in South Africa; Northern Thailand, Argentina and most recently in Rajesthan in India. Telling the stories of people and organisations within the non-profit sector, where images can create meaningful change for good, helps her merge her love of humanitarian storytelling and seeing the world.  

While carefully made images are important to her, she has fun with her photography too and loves personal photo projects involving photo books and travel journals. Her photographic adventures have taken her from India to Iran, Uzbekistan to Iceland, Canada to Cuba, Patagonia to Peru, Singapore to Spain and many places in between.

1. What makes you passionate about helping SEED (www.seed.org.za)?

I like the idea of purposeful travel and photography. I value the role of education and learning, having spent my working life involved in this industry in Australia and overseas. Spending time with the Seed organisation will allow me to learn more about who they are, what they do and what impact their work has on the communities with which they engage. 

2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

That's the first question I will ask them. I hope my photography can help SEED explain and promote their work, tell their stories in an ethical and authentic way and garner more support for their work in tangible ways that count.

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters? 

Telling visual stories about good things people in non profit organisations are doing to educate and inspire youth from disadvantaged backgrounds is a worthwhile investment. 

Support Lee Bartran (Malawi)

Support Lee Bartran (Malawi)

I’m Lee….a Colorado native, single mom to seven (four who were adopted), deep-thinking introvert who is passionate about travel, photography and storytelling for change.  

For 10 years,  my work was focused on orphaned children in China,  creating foster care programs, leading medical trips, and creating my own non-profit which operated in China.  My work  allowed medically frail orphaned children to get the medical care they needed, education and a loving environment where they could thrive.    It was incredibly rewarding  work….but it was hard.  

It takes a special kind of person to run an NGO…. a dedication that goes far beyond the typical 8-5.   Long hours, sometimes being the manager, volunteer coordinator & fundraiser all in one, guided by one strong vision.   It’s a journey I know personally, so to  have the opportunity to work alongside Chepembere Community Development Organization  (CCDO)  and share their work  feels like an incredible opportunity.   Located in rural Malawi,  they are doing work to empower women and children, teach entrepreneurial skills while focusing on gender equality….and they are making change.  Their core belief that  “ to empower women is to empower the entire society” is one that resonates deeply with  me personally.  

Spending a few weeks by their side,  hearing their heart and seeing their work first hand will provide the perfect backdrop to share their story.    When you combine powerful imagery with storytelling, and share your message with the world, it’s  impactful. …something I have experienced first hand.  So to play a small role in sharing their work, feels incredible and an opportunity I am so grateful for.  

Support Lee Rubin-Jakober

Support Lee Rubin-Jakober

Bio

Lee Rubin-Jakober is an avid traveler, teacher, and photographer. She grew up in central Massachusetts but has lived outside of America for the last five years. Lee has taught both high school photography and classes geared towards adults. She believes in the powerful stories that images can tell and uses her photography to bring truth and light to relevant issues like education and equal rights.

1. What makes you passionate about helping Alpine Peace Crossing?

I am passionate for people who are working to make a difference, who serve on behalf of others. Alpine Peace Crossing is clearly motivated not only to help refugees and those seeking asylum but also to pay tribute to those who came before them, honoring the Jewish Exodus in 1947 with a remembrance walk.

2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

I believe that photography has the power to tell stories, to catch the attention that words cannot. It speaks to a level of human interaction, demonstrating the inner workings of an organization. I believe that photographs will help get the Alpine Peace Crossing’s message out. That with the help of Photographers Without Borders, they can be recognized for the incredible work they are doing to help refugees and those seeking asylum.

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I would like my supporters to know that I believe in the world that the Alpine Peace Crossing is doing and that I am honored to be able to witness and take part in their reflection and tribute to those who came before them.

Support Samantha Hines

Support Samantha Hines

BIO

Samantha Hines is a documentary family photography living in Denver, Colorado. She studied Psychology, Sociology, and Spanish at Oklahoma State University and earned a master’s degree in Spanish Linguistics from NYU Madrid in Spain. Sam discovered her love for documentary photography while photographing a family road trip through the western United States and quickly realized that capturing in-between family moments using the documentary approach was her calling. For the last two and a half years, Sam has been documenting moments for families in their homes, at their weddings, and at other events, eschewing the posed in favor of the authentic.

1. What makes you passionate about helping La Esperanza Granada (LEG)

It’s always been difficult for me to decide which charity to support – helping those trapped in the cycle of poverty, protecting the environment, LGBTQ and gender equality – how is one to choose among so many important issues? Eventually, though, I realized that finding solutions to these problems rests on having an educated populace. By educating children, La Esperanza Granada helps brighten the future of not just the children they are helping, but of society as a whole. Supporting education supports all causes.

2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

In today’s social media driven world, the importance of impactful photography to tell a story and grab a user’s attention cannot be overstated. Non-profits and NGOs like La Esperanza Granada rely on outside support and having images that show potential volunteers and donors exactly how and who they are helping is vital. I believe that my images will help create the connection needed for La Esperanza Granada to gain supporters and grow.

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I cannot thank you enough. Please know that there is no contribution too small; any support you are able to give is deeply appreciated.

Support Jon Lloyd

Support Jon Lloyd

Jon's first travel experience was when his family moved to Guam when he was just shy of 1 year old. His parents were avid travelers and loved to explore whatever part of the world they were stationed in, most often in a camper van. He has since traveled to over 70 countries on 6 continents, looking to explore the people, culture, and wildlife of a place. One of the first things he does when he arrives is to go wander and get lost in the local markets or back alleys where life really happens. He actively looks for opportunities to engage locals in dialog about their life and dreams. He is currently on an extended sabbatical from his role running training programs for enterprise software companies. After attending the PWB School in Sumatra in 2018, Jon has three PWB assignments in 2019.

What makes you passionate about helping the organization?

My first trip to the African continent was in 2014 where I blended a traditional Tanzanian safari with visits to clinics, schools, and non-profits. It was my first real glimpse into how small non-profits and NGOs can make significant steps in improving the quality of life. What drew me to Abofra is their focus on computer education and their outreach program into under-served communities. As someone who has been deeply involved in teaching software over the last 20 years, the importance of this literacy is critical to economic success.

Abofra Foundation believe we are in a technological age and the development of every nation depends on its citizen passion for I.C.T. (Information & Communications Technology). Children being our major focus means, every child must have easy access to computer education.


How do you believe your photography can make a difference?

What I love about the Abofra Foundation is their commitment to children as well as the community as a whole. This holistic approach is deeply moving and I hope that I can capture that impact to move more people to support this community and stunningly beautiful country.  


What message would you like to send to your supporters?

It is my deepest hope that supporting Abofra in Ghana will allow them to grow awareness of their cause for both art and computer education for children, and the community outreach program, which visits disadvantaged communities and towns with a full range of development programs.


Support Kim and Julien Annand

Support Kim and Julien Annand

As a mother and son team we are more than excited to work together as we embark on this adventure to assist SASANE in Nepal.  Our hope is to create moving photography and videography that will motivate more victims to come forward and to assist SASANE in educating the community, not just locally, but globally too.

We are inspired by SASANE, who are dedicated to providing opportunities for vulnerable girls and women.  I am especially interested in their paralegal program.  As a lawyer myself, I see the benefit in educating women about the law and empowering them to stand up for their rights and the rights of others.  SASANE is giving victims a fighting chance, one that they would not otherwise have.  SASANE provides victims with a soft place to land and hope for their future, through education, skills training, and counselling. They turn victims into advocates and champions for their own lives.

Human trafficking affects not only today’s generation of women, but many generations to come. NGO’s, like SASANE, who are spearheaded by survivors themselves, are a testament to the fact that girls/women have the power and tenacity to make a difference in their own lives and the lives of so many others. They can contribute. Their value to their communities can be boundless! We are honoured and privileged to be given the opportunity to let others see that. 

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHERS

As a lawyer I have been advocating for the vulnerable for almost 20 years. It was a natural progression for me to use my lens as a means to extend that advocacy in my photography.  I rose from a life of poverty and injustices, to achieve my goals, which became the motivation for my passion to help others.  My background affords me a unique perspective and provides me with tools to bring compassion and understanding to my work as a photographer.  I always strive to keep learning new things, about new places and cultures, and opening up my mind to new experiences.  I have an incurable case of wanderlust and feel so alive behind my camera.  

I have two children and a granddaughter, who is 8.  They travel with me a lot. In fact, my son, Julien will be joining me on some of these adventures to do videography. Julien is a talented musician, mastering the piano at a young age, is quick witted and very bright.  He aspires to be a computer programmer and is committed to social justice, being involved in various volunteer activities in our community and at school. 

Support Zoe Wittering

Support Zoe Wittering

PWB had the chance to sit down with Zoe Wittering to discuss her upcoming trip to Ukraine.

The Photographer

Zoé is a lifestyle and portrait photographer living in the South of France. She grew up in England, studied law and french at university and went on to train and qualify as a corporate lawyer. She worked in London for several years , then moved to Moscow, Russia which is where her photography journey started. Wanting to capture and document the places she travelled to she found herself increasingly drawn to photographing people, which has now become her passion. For the last sixteen years she has lived in Russia and France. Motivated by the desire to show the beauty in the ordinary Zoe uses a documentary approach in her photography and videography. She loved to tell the story of the people she photographs in images and words.

1. What makes you passionate about helping Zaporuka?

Everybody has dreams. But if your child has cancer you have only one dream. That is for treatment and recovery. We live in a world where research and hard work has meant that many illnesses can now be treated and children suffering can recover or at least suffer less. However, this is not the case everywhere. Can you imagine knowing that the medication and treatment for your child exists but that it is not available to them? Me neither. That is why I am passionate about helping them.

2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

Organisations like Zaporuka rely on donations and volunteers.  They need to tell the world what they are doing to continue to receive donations and attract new donors and volunteers.

We live in a world where we are bombarded with information. People flick through social media posts and barely take the time to read the titles of news items let alone the content. A photograph can convey a message, an emotion. It can tell a story in seconds. It is hard not to care about some one when you can clearly see their eyes. I can create photographs which show the work Zaporuka is doing day in, day out. I can show people the children and families the organisation is helping. Real people, real lives. These images can be used to increase awareness of the work they do and the support they need.

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I would like to say "thank you”. No contribution is too small. Sharing my story, buying a print or booking a portrait session. Thank you for any and all support.

Support Bryan Watt & Leila Srour

Support Bryan Watt & Leila Srour

PWB had the chance to sit down with Bryan Watt & Leila Srour to discuss their upcoming trip to Guatemala.

The Project

Bryan Watt and Leila Srour MD, have been selected by Photographers Without Borders to document The Maya Health Alliance - Wuqu' Kawoq, www.mayahealth.org project. This project works to transform the health of Maya communities in Guatemala believing that everyone–no matter where they were born or what language they speak–should have the highest quality health care. The Maya Health Alliances work in Guatemala’s most impoverished communities, solving their pressing health care needs. They overcome barriers to health–uniting medicine, culture, and language. The Maya Health Alliance is recognized as a leader in the field of nutrition, one of the most significant aspects of child health in Guatemala. They help other organizations in Guatemala to implement their own nutrition programs and conduct nutrition research funded by other institutions. They also care for children with complex illnesses such as cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, seizure disorders, and cancer.


The Photographer

Over the years, my wife Leila and I have reported on many health-related organizations in Southeast Asia, South Asia, the Pacific, and on eleven projects in eight countries on the African Continent. Leila, a pediatrician (MD, FAAP, MPH, DTM&H), can evaluate and share from a medical perspective while I document through photography. Each visit has provided us with local knowledge, ways of doing things, creative solutions, contact information, and inspiration that we are able to share with other projects.

We look forward to this opportunity to help the Maya Health Alliance. They are dedicated to helping the underserved indigenous community by providing access to medical care in their language. We hope to share, contribute, and learn as we have done with rural health projects and indigenous communities elsewhere. Hopefully, the Maya Health Alliance will benefit from our knowledge and professional photographs to convey understanding and produce compassionate empathy as part of their donor relations strategy to generate increased philanthropic support.


Bryan Watt Biography

After teaching at Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, my full-time goal for the previous 16 years has been to help those in need. I can’t do it myself, but I’m able to assist the organizations that are helping them. I can contribute with photographs that create a sense of purpose and cohesiveness, raise credibility, and share accomplishments and successes with donors. My photos focus on the feelings of people who are in need, create emotional empathy and make it harder not to help them.

Since 2004, we helped those less fortunate by moving to a small village in the Lao PDR, building a school building, selecting and supporting scholarship students, assisting patients to access medical care locally, nationally, internationally, and sometimes attending funeral ceremonies. We provide ongoing support to this community.

Bryan and his wife Leila Srour, a pediatrician have been living in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos) from 2002 to 2013. Now they are always on the road with no home base.


Leila Srour Biography

Leila Srour is a pediatrician and an international volunteer, supporting pediatric training in developing countries. This year, she is working in Laos and Bhutan. Last year, she volunteered in Cambodia, Nepal, Laos, and Bhutan.

From 2002-2013, Leila volunteered with Health Frontiers supporting the training of Lao pediatricians and the continuing medical education of the graduates. With her husband, Bryan, they supported the Butterfly Children’s Development Center, an after-school program in their village in Luang Namtha, northern Laos.

Leila completed the Diploma in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in London, 2002. She graduated with a Master’s in Public Health from Loma Linda University in 2001. Leila worked as a general pediatrician in Santa Barbara 1984-2001. She is a Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles pediatric residency 1983 graduate. She graduated from Loma Linda medical school in 1978.


Donor Incentive

Bryan will send you a one-time use lab coupon good for a free custom photographic print from this trip to Guatemala to donors contributing USD 200 or more. You may select from a selection of images once the project is completed and order through www.bryanwatt.com . Prints will ship unsigned directly from the lab with nominal shipping not included. When donating, please leave a note in the comment box with your name and email.

Leila and I have already paid for our trip costs through this website and need no further funding. However, you are welcome to contribute knowing that your donations will be allocated 50/50 between Photographers Without Borders and the Maya Health Foundation in Guatemala. Both are 501(c)3 tax-exempt organizations in the USA.

Website & Blog

www.bryanwatt.com

Social Media

FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/humanitarianphotographer

INSTAGRAM: @bryan.watt


Support Maria Paula (Ukraine)

Support Maria Paula (Ukraine)

What makes you passionate about helping TERGO (tergo.org.ua)? 

I find the work that Tergo does amazing. To educate people and society about the LGBT community and movement is the best way to create new opportunities for them to be integrated. I think we all deserve the same opportunities to work, to live, to be happy. A lot of people reject or don´t approve people who are “different”, who don´t fit in a stablished way of being approved by society. And most of the times it´s because of ignorance about the subject, maybe if people knew a little bit more about the innumerable attributes those people have, all the suffering they have been through to be accepted, and they could discover that there is a human being that is fighting to win a place in this world, their perception would be different. I think we all have a very different and unique story, and we all have our own struggle and we can be more humans if we could try to understand the person next to us instead of judging her. So, I think the work of this NGO is very serious and brave and it makes me more than happy to be able to help. 

 

How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?  

Photography tells a lot about people, about a society, a country, about their traditions and their personal life. A portrait is a reflection of the soul of the person, it a very good way to describe their feelings. Photography can be a very useful way to help them to be understood, to show the work the NGO is doing to help them. So people can take interest, not only in helping them, but also in approaching them to participate in their activities, to get involved  and be part of the community. 

  

What message would you like to send to your supporters? 

This subject concerns us all. We all have a close friend, a member of our family or even ourselves that belong to the LGBT community. We all have our personal preferences in everything and we deserve the same opportunities as everybody. All together we can learn a lot of this project to apply it to our life. By helping me going to this trip we are helping this NGO creating new opportunities, opening new ways for people not just to be accepted but to open their mind and their hearts to different preferences in life. Together we can help a lot and learn a lot about this to bring it to our social circle and family for more peaceful cexisting. 

You can follow my day a day trip and work through my Instagram @maripomartini and also check the past projects on my website www.maripomartini.net 

Maria’s Bio

Moved by social labor, something I love since I was a little girl, I founded an association named Anima-Ars (www.anima-ars.org) with two friends. We are a group of young people from different working and social areas who work with different artistic sources to encourage people in vulnerable situations, discrimination or disadvantage, to provide them a way to express their problematics and be able to rebuild their path and be reinserted in the social life promoting human development. We have done workshops with girls rescued from human trafficking and sexual slavery, kids with congenital heart disease, and abandoned old people.  

I was born and raised in Mexico City, a huge, polluted, and very crowded city. I studied literature and did my social service with the head of the Botanical Garden, a biologist specialized in cacti, that taught me his love for nature. Attracted by the idea of mixing art and nature, I developed a special interest in science diffusion that drove me to discover a talent in storytelling, to transmit knowledge in a comprehensive way. 

Concurrently, in order to escape a little bit of the stressful life of the city, I found a way to connect with my inner self by climbing mountains and diving deep in the sea. Those two worlds are my passion now a day. All of this drew me closer to photography, land and aerial drone photography, a way to discover the world and discover myself by creating a visual diary. I didn’t just found a way to express my place in this chaotic world and to show what my heart sees, but also to loud the voice and the needs of the people who, by their vulnerable momentary situations, can´t talk by themselves. 

Support Maria Paula (Armenia)

Support Maria Paula (Armenia)

What makes you passionate about helping Society Without Violence (http://www.swv.am)

I am a very proactive about gender equality education to promote women and girls empowerment and live in a society where the rights of all people can be the same. I grew up and live in a very violent country because of the drug dealing problem, where a lot of women disappear, in a very patriarchal society where the “machos” are always the head of the family and women are left behind. I think it is a subject that concerns us all as a worldwide society and there is a lot to do about it.  

 

 

How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?  

The first thing to solve a problem is to see it, to identify it, understand it, and then find the solution to it. I think the best way to show the world what is happening to create consciousness, is through visual images, so we can do something about it. 

Last year I went to India with PWB to work with a foundation named Sambahli Trust and after the work I did with them, I sent the photographs to Mexico and could find a sponsor for the scholarship of 6 girls for 5 years. This work was published on the PWB printed magazine nº 10. 

  

What message would you like to send to your supporters? 

Thanks to all the support of people like you, I was able to do a trip to Malawi last summer to work with an NGO named Drug Fight Malawi and I learnt so much about everything: the NGO, the people I met, the society, the culture, the country, etc. I opened my heart to those people and those people opened their heart to me. Lots of people from Mexico helped the communities, we did a campaign to buy clothes and jackets for the kids in the villages to be warm during the cold winter and it was very successful. You can see it on my website (www.maripomartini.net) and also on my Instagram account @maripomartini 

Every donation counts. Your help can make a difference for people who needs it. 

Thank you for helping.

Maria’s Bio

Moved by social labor, something I love since I was a little girl, I founded an association named Anima-Ars (www.anima-ars.org) with two friends. We are a group of young people from different working and social areas who work with different artistic sources to encourage people in vulnerable situations, discrimination or disadvantage, to provide them a way to express their problematics and be able to rebuild their path and be reinserted in the social life promoting human development. We have done workshops with girls rescued from human trafficking and sexual slavery, kids with congenital heart disease, and abandoned old people.  

I was born and raised in Mexico City, a huge, polluted, and very crowded city. I studied literature and did my social service with the head of the Botanical Garden, a biologist specialized in cacti, that taught me his love for nature. Attracted by the idea of mixing art and nature, I developed a special interest in science diffusion that drove me to discover a talent in storytelling, to transmit knowledge in a comprehensive way. 

Concurrently, in order to escape a little bit of the stressful life of the city, I found a way to connect with my inner self by climbing mountains and diving deep in the sea. Those two worlds are my passion now a day. All of this drew me closer to photography, land and aerial drone photography, a way to discover the world and discover myself by creating a visual diary. I didn’t just found a way to express my place in this chaotic world and to show what my heart sees, but also to loud the voice and the needs of the people who, by their vulnerable momentary situations, can´t talk by themselves.