Support Jamie Woytiuk

Support Jamie Woytiuk

Q1. What makes you passionate about helping AEPD?

Growing up with a mom who has a disability from Multiple Sclerosis, I have been witness to the barriers within society. In Canada, there has been movement towards creating accessibility within the community. However, there is still progress to be made in order to become fully accessible, as well as, inclusive. In comparison to resources in Vietnam, Vietnam has even more struggles then Canada, due to the excessive lack of services and societal inclusivity. When individuals can not participate and function as able bodied humans, the likelihood of isolation and depression become more apparent. This further separates them from their community leading to, not only stress on the individual, but for their caregivers. More often then not, those individuals with disabilities rely on family members for their basic care. The stress and overwhelm attributed to caring for family members, while at the same time, the pressure of providing for their family, has developed hardships within those family systems. Clients of AEPD are concerned for the future of their children. Many children are caregivers for their family members, which prevent them from fully engaging in society, and leaving them unprepared for adulthood. Other children have been directly affected by Agent Orange and are unable to care for themselves. AEPD is working to improve the quality of life for those who have disabilities by connecting clients to programs, lobbying the government, and trying to enhance their psychosocial and physical wellbeing.

Q2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

There is power in the art of photography. Photography can be a tool for societal change. As photographers, we are given the opportunity to bring a voice to others experiences. As humans who have disabilities, it is easy to become invisible in society. Photography is a mechanism to validate others experiences by allowing space to create understanding, empathy, and compassion within others. Generating knowledge is power, which in turn, can manifest change and hope. Ultimately, it is my goal to connect humans together by acknowledging the fundamental right to be seen, heard and understood.


Q3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

The effects of the Vietnam War has current day implications. In today’s society, we are consumed by innovation and immediacy. If we do not stay relevant, we become lost. As a photographer, it is my responsibility to create a platform for stories that require a voice. This is one of them. Your support and donations will further help this organization and the current work they are doing. You are allowing their voice to be heard through your donations. I invite you to support AEPD and follow along my journey to Dong Hoi, Vietnam. Thank you.

Support Tad Philipp

Support Tad Philipp

Q1. What makes you passionate about helping EmpowerMen?

EmpowerMen coaches boys and men toward positive masculinity, which helps support the dreams of the women in their lives and reduce gender based violence. This relatively young organization is off to a promising start toward the UN s 5th Sustainable Development Goal: achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls.

As the son, husband, brther and father of empowered wom,en I heartily endorse EmpowerMen s initiatives and appreciate the importanoe of their mission for Madagascar and beyond.

Q2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

I would Iike my photos to help people in Madagascar and elsewhere understand, and then support, EmpowerMen s mission. I wilI use my visual storytelling skills to help them effectively communicate the benefits of their program and their sucess in implementing it across the schools, vulnerable communities and streets in which they work.


Q3. What message would I Ike to send to supporters?

I am ,excited to spend time with the staff of EmpowerMen in early 2020 to docum·ent the work they do helping men stand up for women s rights and to help them effectively communicate their story. Please join me in supporting this important and innovative program. With your help EmpowerMen can continue its work toward a peaceful Madagascar in which boys and men support women in a climate without discrimination.

Support Linda Hart

Support Linda Hart

PWB Assignment 1993 – Nepal

Q1. Short Bio

My working life to date has been people focused. Firstly as a radiographer (a different kind of photography), before venturing  into Human Resources, where I interact with people on a daily basis.

Photography has always been something I’ve enjoyed but could never find a specific type of photography that felt right for me. That all changed after exposure to several humanitarian photographers. I’ve come to the conclusion that is what I’m best at - capturing people and creating images which show their “mauri” (the Maori for “spirit”! ). It has been a great thrill to work with NGO’s and to provide them with images which resonate.

Q2. What makes you passionate about helping Happy Kids Center Nepal?

Nepal and New Zealand have been inextricably linked since the day in 1953 when Sir Edmond Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay stood together on the top of Mt Everest. We also share the legacy of being earthquake prone countries where nature can rip apart our lives in moment.

But we also have significant differences. New Zealand has wealth which allows us to help our citizens recover from devastating events. In Nepal this is not so much the case. Many people suffer and those that suffer the most are the most vulnerable - largely the children.

Happy Kids Centre was established to help close the gap. By providing education, food and basic health the Happy Kids Centre are altering the course of these children’s lives for the better. No longer labouring before they are physically developed or for girls to be married at the time of their first period, these children now have a chance.

I am passionate about playing a small part in improving their lives.


Q3. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?
 

I have had the opportunity to spend time with several humanitarian photographers and learn of the power that photographs have. I have also had the privilege to work with two NGO’s in Cambodia and experienced the thrill that comes from seeing my photographs being used by them in a way that benefits those they are working to support.

Many of us will recall specific photographs in our lives, be that the images from 9/11 in New York or Nick Ut’s “Napalm Girl” in the Vietnam war. It may be something closer to home - perhaps a family photo that has always been in your house.  It is not uncommon that such images imprint themselves on us and illicit a deep and heartfelt response.

In the case of this assignment what I will be looking to achieve is to take photographs which Happy Kids Centre will be able to use to gain support for their work.

Q4. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

The lives of these children are something we find difficult to comprehend. There will be few if any links to what we experienced as children or that our children and grandchildren will experience. Yet on a daily basis the children that Happy Kid’s support live in poverty. Without intervention they are unable to break the cycle into which they were born.

Your support for this project will help the NGO improve outcomes for the children!

Support Raquel da Silva

Support Raquel da Silva

Q1. Short Bio

I am an independent Design Director and Photographer based in London. I grew
up in Portugal where I studied music from 1997 to 2010 and by 2004, I was convinced I would be a photojournalist, before ending up taking a degree in Visual Communication. In 2010, I moved to London and graduated with a Masters in Graphic Branding & Identity from the London College of Communication. I began working as a designer and photographer in 2011 and since then, have been helping brands create their own story over images, graphics and emotional story-telling. Both my photographic and graphic work has been industry recognised and awarded.


Q2. What makes you passionate about helping Rajasthan Samgrah Kalyan Sansthan

“Approximately, 27933 cases of "violence against women" are registered every year in police stations of the state Rajasthan, India. The average daily statistics are quite horrifying; 40 complaints of “violence against women”, 10 cases of rape, and 3 dowry-death cases every 48 hours are registered in Rajasthan police stations.” The Rajasthan Samgrah Kalyan
Sansthan (RSKS India) Even though I have been portraying some sort of story through a certain lens, I don’t feel I have been telling the right story. So I have reached Photographers without Borders and now feel humbled to have been given the opportunity to further open my eyes and be part of what PWB and The Rajasthan Samgrah Kalyan Sansthan (RSKS India) NGO are doing for the marginalised communities. These are stories of utmost importance, the ones that should really matter, as they are the most urgent.
I would like to stand by my subjects and document their cause, shedding light
on the horrors they are facing. By journalling their lives, I hope we can create a movement to fight against the oppressive system they operate within and regain some of their rights.
People in India are disproportionately affected by poverty, descrimination,
illiteracy, social evils. We need to raise awareness to these issues and help them find the strength to fight for their rights and entitlements. Most child marriages in India involve prostitution, sex slaves and rape, all of which come from a place of constant vulnerability and uneducated people and conforming ideas that have been going on for generations. I want to amplify their voices and show them how they can amplify them too. It is important to fight against this patriarchal system and give back with an open heart, compassion and mindfulness.


Q3. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?
I am a story-teller by heart, and a firm believer that the right image and message
can change lives. In the digital age, we are bombarded with thousands of messages and images on a daily basis which make us feel like we are connecting with others. The truth is that we are not, and we are not telling the right stories. Images tell stories – Afghan Girl, the famous National Geographic image, became an emblem of a refugee crisis – and focussed the world’s attention. These are the stories which need to be told.


Q4. What message would you like to send to your supporters?
When helping RSKS India, you are helping thousands of women, men and children from deprived and marginalised communities. All contributions (no matter how small) will help sustain the multiple empowerment projects being implemented in the areas, such as fighting violence against women and poverty, access to education and health services, and finding ways to secure a sustainable living, which in turn will help build back up the confidence and lives of many.For any donation above $100 dollars, I would like to send you my warmest and honest thank you, together with a 30x40 cm print of your choice from my photographic portfolio. I would just ask you to leave an email so I can contact you back.

Website: https://designbyraquel.co.uk

Support Sally Thomson

Support Sally Thomson

Q1. What makes you passionate about helping Misión Gaia?

I didn’t start out seeking a career in photography. I started out as a landscape architect, with an interest in sustainable design.  Along the way I became involved with a small NGO working to protect the Peruvian Amazon Rainforest and its culture. What I discovered was a small group of dedicated and committed people whose efforts, working hand and hand with local communities, had a profound impact on the region – for the better. It was a story that I believe needed to be told, so began my interest in making images, as a way to show what was happening in this and other significant corners of the world.

I am particularly honored to help tell the story of Misión Gaia through photography.  Their mission is not unlike that of the group I worked with in the Amazon – to promote the sustainable use of natural resources and increase the well-being of communities in Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, Columbia. Considered the tallest coastal range in the world, and a designated UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.  Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta is valued for its variety of ecosystems, high number of endemic species, rich biodiversity, and hydrological resources.  It is also home, and sacred land to four indigenous groups. The area has been off limits for many years during Columbia’s long civil war. Peace has brought new opportunities for exploration, and with it the challenges of development. For the past 8 years Misión Gaia has been working diligently to protect one of the world’s most significant places by providing environmental education and strategies to reduce the impact of development, and unsustainable tourism.


Q2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

 I have pursued making photographs for many years, initially as a tool for documenting design, later on as a way to understand the world and its potential for creating awareness about contemporary issues. In this instance, I believe photography provides a real opportunity to help connect people with their natural heritage and explore the important links between communities and natural ecosystems. My intent is to create compelling imagery for Misión Gaia in a way that is engaging, communicates a story of hope, and helps inspire local as well as global communities to care about the choices they make about their environments.


Q3.  What message would you like to send to your supporters?

 From my point of view, everything on this planet is connected.

That promoting sustainable communities helps increase or at least maintain biodiversity which underpins life as we know it - the air we breathe, the food we eat and the water we drink. Its loss puts the earth’s natural assets at risk along with our own health and livelihoods. That supporting grassroots organizations like Misión Gaia, and others like it around the world, are small steps that can make an impact both locally and globally.

Support Tad Philipp

Support Tad Philipp

Q1. What makes you passionate about helping WomenWeave?

I love that WomenWeave empowers women in central India and also helps them to maintain a craft that is important to India’s cultural heritage. From my perspective as the son, husband and father of strong and independent-minded women, I appreciate how important empowered women are to their families and to their communities.

This will be my second trip to India, and I truly enjoyed my prior experience with Indian people and culture. I am honored to be invited to WomenWeave as part of the PWB program to create images that will help share their inspiring story.


Q2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

Photographic images have the power to help others understand a story in a deep and nuanced way, in many cases inspiring a call to action. By creating images that are authentic, respectful and and impactful I hope to enhance WomenWeave’s global donor outreach as well as help them sell their exquisite products.

For more about WomenWeave go to: WomenWeave.org For Tad’s photography portfolio go to: earthwindphoto.com


Q3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I am fortunate to have had a successful business career and will fully funding the program fee and expenses. Therefore, 100% of your donation will be shared equally between PWB and WomenWeave. You already know that NGO’s such as WomenWeave make a big difference in the communities they serve, and that a small donation goes a long way in developing economies. Please donate now to this wonderful and worthy organization.

Support Ken Kurzweil

Support Ken Kurzweil

BIO

I was born, raised and still live in the suburbs of New York City.  During a very rewarding 35-year career as a teacher of computer science and life sciences, I was also heavily involved in the New York State Teachers Union and a number of Social Justice/Civil & Human Rights issues.   In the Teachers Union, which represents over 600,00 members and over 1,200 local unions, I was chair of their Civil & Human Rights Committee for over 15 years.  I received the greatest honor of my life when in 2016 they created the annual “Ken Kurzweil Social Justice Recognition Award” which is awarded each year to local unions that support social justice causes throughout the year. 

After retiring from teaching, photography quickly rose to become a very important passion of mine.  Photography has brought me to places I never imagined I would travel and allowed me to get to know different cultures around the world.   I had been looking for ways to incorporate my commitment to social justice with my photography when I discovered Photographers Without Borders.  After participating in the PWB School program in Jodhpur, I felt that it was important for me to continue my work with PWB in one of their programs.

 

What makes you passionate about helping Turning Point (www.turningpoint.org.in)

Mental illness is a topic that is not understood by many people around the world.  When it strikes, it is often not accepted by the family and the victim is stigmatized and often does not receive any treatment.  The mentally ill become isolated and lose any confidence that they can be a part of normal society.

The Turning Point has a goal of rehabilitating mentally challenged people and through their many programs restoring them to mainstream life where they can become confident, self-dependent and productive individuals.

The work of Turning Pont is extremely important and information about their programs need to be seen by a larger audience. 


How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them?

The stories about the programs and successes of Turning Point can be told in a very powerful way through photography.  A photograph can often explain in a very impactful way what words often cannot.   The power of the photograph can accomplish a great deal for Turning Point giving them resources that can be used for their publicity, fundraising and social media. 

It is my goal to give this important non-profit organization tools that they can use to better achieve their goals.


What message would you like to send your supporters?

While the problems of the world may often seem too overwhelming to deal with, I have learned that ground level organizations which help people one-at-a-time are life-changing and often life-saving.  The Turning Point is one such organization that helps people on a path of recovery and functionality from mental disabilities, often not understood or accepted in India.  I am very fortunate to be able to help this non-profit organization through my photography.

Support Samantha Moss

Support Samantha Moss

1. What makes you passionate about helping Alejo Community Support Project?

I admire NGOs like Alejo Community Support Project and the individuals who work for these grassroots initiatives. There are currently over 7 billion people in the world and it is easy to shrug responsibility and think 'Well, it doesn't really matter what I do or don't do...' But we are all at the center of a network.

You'll probably know at least 1,000 people over the course of your life. Those individuals will also probably know at least 1,000 people, which puts you 1 person away from a million. 2 people away from a billion. This is how we are connected.

The actions we take are like dropping a pebble in a pond. The ripples created by that action will expand and affect things in ways we can't really comprehend. It means the things that you do or don't do are far more important than you think. 

I am passionate about helping Alejo CSP because it is a meaningful cause, furthering sustainable development and generating real change in people's lives. 


2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

Photography has an amazing capacity to capture (no pun intended) our attention and tell a story to the viewer in a way words cannot. 

Grassroots initiatives like Alejo make direct, meaningful impacts in communities and better the standard of living for countless individuals. It is my job, as a photographer, to shine a light on their work and to help tell their stories. There is no way of knowing who will see these photos and what in turn they might be inspired to do to further positive change. 

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

If you would like to support the work we do, please make a donation or get involved in any you are motivated to. 

For any donation above $100 I would like to send you a personal thank-you in the form of a print of your choice from my portfolio. 

Please make sure to leave your email so that I may contact you for a mailing address.

Support Matt Timmins

Support Matt Timmins

BIO

I am a freelance photographer with a background in photojournalism based out of Revelstoke, BC, Canada.

Most of my time at home is spent exploring mountains, forests and lakes by foot, snowboard or bike. When I’m not at home I am exploring new countries, putting myself out of my comfort zone to photograph the natural beauty of the world and immersing myself in new cultures.

1. What makes you passionate about helping Planet Drum Foundation (www.planetdrum.org)?

Becoming ecologically sustainable should be a goal for every city. The dedication and work that Planet Drum is doing in Bahía de Caráquez, Ecuador, to help the community build and maintain sustainable ways to meet human needs such as water, food, energy and resources is inspiring and something I want to be a part of first-hand. They are working to teach the community the benefits of bringing forests back to recovery, building nature reserves and providing education on how living sustainably can help them in the long-term. I want to immerse myself in this project to both be able to help this eco-city and Planet Drum, and also to be able to come home with valuable experience of what it means to live in a sustainable city and use bioregional principals.

2. How do you believe your photography can make a difference for them? 

Part of Planet Drum’s efforts involve workshops, school presentations and community education. Besides bringing the community out to workshops for hands-on demonstrations, a large part of helping people get an idea of what Planet Drum is doing is through visuals. Through photos and video, I can help show the importance of the work this NGO is doing.

As well, the NGO would not be able to function without volunteers and interns. Using visuals to help paint a picture of Planet Drum is doing will help recruit volunteers, supporters and raise global awareness.

3. What message would you like to send to your supporters?

I invite you to follow along as I document Planet Drum’s work and the community of Bahía de Caráquez this June in Ecuador. You’ll be able to see updates on my own social media, as well as through Photographers Without Borders. Everyone can benefit from taking more steps to urban sustainably, and I’m excited to share and learn new initiatives with you. The project would not be possible without volunteers and donations from the past 15 years, and new projects and work is not possible without continued support. If you are able, I ask for your support as I head to Ecuador this June. No donation is too small.

Thank you.

Support Lee Bartran (Cambodia)

Support Lee Bartran (Cambodia)

BIO

I’m Lee….a Colorado native, single mom to seven (four who were adopted), deep-thinking introvert who is passionate about travel, photography, giving back and storytelling for change.  

I am so excited to  have the opportunity to work alongside Damnok Toek in Cambodia and help them to share about the incredible work they are doing with vulnerable children.   Working with children has been an integral and important part of my personal and work life.  For 10 years,  my work was focused on orphaned children in China,  creating foster care programs, leading medical trips, and creating my own non-profit which operated in China.  My work  allowed medically frail orphaned children to get the medical care they needed, education and a loving environment where they could thrive.   

I have seen first hand the difference that can be made in a child’s life if they are given hope and opportunity.  Damnok Toek’s focus on street children, children with disabilities and trafficking victims is giving these children just that.  Spending a few weeks by their side,  hearing their heart and seeing their work first hand will provide the perfect backdrop to share their story.    When you combine powerful imagery with storytelling, and share your message with the world, it’s  impactful. …something I have experienced first hand.  So to play a small role in sharing their work, feels incredible and an opportunity I am so grateful for.  

Support Kim and Julien Annand

Support Kim and Julien Annand

As a mother and son team we are more than excited to work together as we embark on this adventure to assist SASANE in Nepal.  Our hope is to create moving photography and videography that will motivate more victims to come forward and to assist SASANE in educating the community, not just locally, but globally too.

We are inspired by SASANE, who are dedicated to providing opportunities for vulnerable girls and women.  I am especially interested in their paralegal program.  As a lawyer myself, I see the benefit in educating women about the law and empowering them to stand up for their rights and the rights of others.  SASANE is giving victims a fighting chance, one that they would not otherwise have.  SASANE provides victims with a soft place to land and hope for their future, through education, skills training, and counselling. They turn victims into advocates and champions for their own lives.

Human trafficking affects not only today’s generation of women, but many generations to come. NGO’s, like SASANE, who are spearheaded by survivors themselves, are a testament to the fact that girls/women have the power and tenacity to make a difference in their own lives and the lives of so many others. They can contribute. Their value to their communities can be boundless! We are honoured and privileged to be given the opportunity to let others see that. 

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHERS

As a lawyer I have been advocating for the vulnerable for almost 20 years. It was a natural progression for me to use my lens as a means to extend that advocacy in my photography.  I rose from a life of poverty and injustices, to achieve my goals, which became the motivation for my passion to help others.  My background affords me a unique perspective and provides me with tools to bring compassion and understanding to my work as a photographer.  I always strive to keep learning new things, about new places and cultures, and opening up my mind to new experiences.  I have an incurable case of wanderlust and feel so alive behind my camera.  

I have two children and a granddaughter, who is 8.  They travel with me a lot. In fact, my son, Julien will be joining me on some of these adventures to do videography. Julien is a talented musician, mastering the piano at a young age, is quick witted and very bright.  He aspires to be a computer programmer and is committed to social justice, being involved in various volunteer activities in our community and at school. 

Support Rachael

Support Rachael

Rachael is fundraising for her chance to take a PWB School workshop. These workshops have changed the lives of countless participants, and we hope you will join us in supporting Rachael on her journey to taking a course that will give back to a grassroots organization in need and learn at the same time.

Rachael's Story

I'm an aspiring photographer who wants to one day travel the world and document my adventures and hopefully inspire others. I hope to expand my knowledge in photography as much as possible so I can continue to grow and better myself as not only a photographer but an artist as well. I've always wanted to help out others in anyway I could; I did a lot whilst in Girl Scouts and still want to continue that but have never had the voice to do so until I started pursuing photography. This is important to me because it's everything I want rolled into one; helping others, travelling, becoming more knowledgeable, and inspiring others. As photographers we have the opportunity to use photography as a voice for those who don't have one.

Why do you want to participate on a PWB Workshop? 

I would benefit from a workshop because not only would I be expanding my photography but I'd be experiencing another culture and raising awareness through my art.